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1969  one hundred thousand dollar Treasury Bill

Issued at a 7.34% Approximate Yield, Six-month Maturity

           

 $1.2 Billon Issued

Treasury Bills, also known as T-Bills, are short-term debt securities. Treasury Bills are a form of a zero-coupon bond.  Treasury Notes and Treasury Bonds, T-Bills do not have interest payments.  Instead, the debt is sold at a discounted value relative to their redemption or par value. This discount reflects the interest rate that the Bill carries.  An auction process determines the interest rate (discount) the bills will be sold at.  They are shortest duration security auctioned by the Treasury Department, and are typically sold in  4, 13, 26, and 52-week issues.

 

This example is one of two known of this denomination

1970  one thousand dollar Treasury Bill

Issued at a 7.76% Approximate Yield, Six-month Maturity

                          

 $1.2 Billon Issued

This Treasury Bill is one of the very last $1,000 denominated securities issued.  In 1970, The

Treasury Department raised the minimum denomination for T-Bills to ten thousand dollars.

Possibly Unique

Copyright The Joe I. Herbstman Memorial Collection of American Finance 

 

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